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Home > Images Dated > 2004

Images Dated 2004

Choose from 3,520 pictures in our Images Dated 2004 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Captain Woolf Barnato with his Bentley Featured 2004 Image

Captain Woolf Barnato with his Bentley

Captain Woolf Barnato with his Speed Six Bentley fitted with a racing body. Woolf Barnato had just beaten the Blue Train from Monte Carlo to Calais in this (or similar) car. This body is only one if its kind, built by Gurney Nutting. The car still exists

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans

07, 1930, 21, 28th, Barnato, Beaten, Bentley, Body, Built, Calais, Captain, Car, Carlo, Dec, Exists, Fitted, Gurney, Historical, History, Iln, Import, June, Kind, Monte, Nutting, Racing, Similar, Woolf

Lockheed P-38 Lightning in action; Second World War, 1944 Featured 2004 Image

Lockheed P-38 Lightning in action; Second World War, 1944

Illustration showing an US Air Force Lockheed P-38 Lightning shooting down a German aeroplane during the Second World War. The Lightning was a highly successful twin-engined escort fighter, with a top speed of 360mph and a range of at least 1000 miles. This illustration was painted by C.E. Turner, the Illustrated London News special artist, from sketches made at an American airfield in Britain, 1944

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans

Captain Francis Crozier of HMS Terror, 1845 Featured 2004 Image

Captain Francis Crozier of HMS Terror, 1845

Engraving of Captain Francis Crozier (1796-1848) of HMS Terror, pictured shortly before departing on the ill-fated Franklin Arctic expedition of 1845. In 1845 the British Admiralty sent two polar exploration ships, HMS Erebus and HMS Terror, to look for the Northwest passage round the northern coast of Canada. The expedition, commanded by Sir John Franklin, disappeared from view late in 1845 and none of the men were ever seen again. In fact the ships made it to the King William Island region, then got stuck in the ice. With supplies running out the surviving crew abandoned ship and headed south. However, none made it to safety and it is assumed all died from disease, exposure or starvation. From 1848 onwards a number of relief expeditions were sent to find Franklin, but it was only in 1859 that Francis Leopold McClintock was able to confirm Franklin's fate

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans