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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Underwater Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 179 pictures in our Underwater collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

Ephemera danica, mayfly larva

The larval stage of a mayfly lasts about a year, and is spent entirely underwater. When it hatches as an adult in the spring, usually May, it is only very short-lived. Date:

© Mary Evans / Natural History Museum

Animal, Aquatic, Arthropod, Arthropoda, Common Burrower Mayfly, Day, Day Time, Daytime, Ephemera, Ephemera Danica, Ephemeridae, Ephemeroptera, Green Drake, Hexapod, Hexapoda, Insect, Insecta, Insects, Invertebrata, Invertebrate, Ladybirds And Lobsters, Ladybirds Lobsters, Larva, Larvae, Mayfly, Nymph, One, Outdoor, Outside, Spring, Underwater

Featured Print

Underwater house, Plymouth

A female physicist multitasking (reading a magazine whilst knitting) in Sealab II, Britain's first permanent underwater laboratory, 30 feet below the waves off the coast of Plymouth, Devon. A couple of years after the expedition to Paradise Bay (see Underwater House Malta), David Baume from Enfield College of Technology and his team of sub-aqua enthusiasts made another attempt to construct an underwater home, this time off a breakwater in the middle of Plymouth Sound. Instead of using rubberised fabric, the new structure featured a massive cylindrical steel tank. This was lowered into the harbour and weighed down with several tons of pig iron ingots. These were lowered beneath the tank by means of a fairly primitive pulley system and then had to be manhandled off the trolley and positioned under the house. The water was almost pitch dark, extremely dirty and very cold. It took more than 200 dives to complete the operation and ensure that, when filled with air, the cylinder would stay on the bottom of the harbour rather than rise to the surface and turn turtle, with potentially fatal consequences for those inside. But finally the underwater house was ready for occupancy and fitted with the special air scrubber that David and his team had developed to ensure the air remained fresh. Several members of the team spent considerable periods of time living beneath the waves, turning the workbench into a bunk bed for overnight stays. Date: early 1970s

© Mary Evans Picture Library/DAVID LEWIS HODGSON

Featured Print

Students with underwater house equipment, Malta

Students and equipment connected with an underwater, inflatable house on a beach in Malta. One student is being fitted with diving gear. The house was anchored to the seabed, some 50 feet deep, in Paradise Bay, off the coast of Malta. It was equipped with lighting, telephone and immersion heaters with which the inhabitants could make hot drinks. It was constructed by teams of engineers and diving enthusiasts from Imperial College of Science and Technology and Enfield College of Technology. It was 9ft long and 6ft wide, constructed from rubberised material on a steel frame, and weighed around 500 lb. The team leader was David Baume who hoped it would be the first of a series of low cost underwater living spaces from which scientists could explore the seas. David and some other team members were able to spend a night 30 feet below the surface. The following day a severe storm caused the house to collapse. Date: 1969

© Mary Evans Picture Library/DAVID LEWIS HODGSON