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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Ice Berg Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 67 pictures in our Ice Berg collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


View of the luxurious reading room onboard the Titanic Featured Print

View of the luxurious reading room onboard the Titanic

A view of one of the many luxurious interior features of the Titanic; the reading and writing room. First class passengers travelled in style onboard the Titanic, having free use of the gym, the Parisian caf and the swimming pool. Built by the shipyard Harland and Wolff for White Star Lines, the liner was almost identical to her sister ship, Olympic and was a rival to Cunard's Lusitania and Mauretania'. On her maiden voyage across the Atlantic, the Titanic struck an iceberg on 15th April 1912 and sank with the loss of 1503 lives"

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans

Titanic - Danger Field of the Atlantic with routes through i Featured Print

Titanic - Danger Field of the Atlantic with routes through i

A diagram or map showing the dangerous area of the Atlantic Ocean indicating steamer routes that cut through fog and ice. It was here that the Titanic hit an iceberg on 15 April 1912 and sank with the loss of over 1500 lives. Described here in The Sphere in its report on the disaster as a fog factory, due to the warm gulf stream meeting the cold Labrador current. Date: 1912

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans

Titanic - How Ice Blink reveals the presence of bergs Featured Print

Titanic - How Ice Blink reveals the presence of bergs

Diagram in The Sphere during the inquiry into the Titanic disaster showing how ice blink reveals the presence of bergs underneath the water. The term ice blink, in common use with polar explorers describes the reflecting capacity of granulated portions of berg in contradistinction to the darkness of clear ice. Under favourable conditions, icebergs appear to glow with this blink, an effect which can be detected when the berg is on the far-distant horizon. Under unfortunate conditions, the berg may give forth no blink and in the case of the Titanic there was also the absence of a phosphorescent line round the berg which would have helped to indicate the nearness of ice. The depth below water is calculated on the assumption that six-sevenths of the berg are below the water-line. Date: 1912

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans