Skip to main content
sales@mediastorehouse.co.uk

Toxic Gallery

Available as Prints and Gift Items

Choose from 17 pictures in our Toxic collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Poisonous Plants
Poisonous Plants
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Victorian Wallpaper - in popular emerald green - which contained poisonous arsenic
Victorian Wallpaper - in popular emerald green - which contained poisonous arsenic
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Poison ivy, Toxicodendron radicans, and poison
Poison ivy, Toxicodendron radicans, and poison
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Cyanide dumps, Johannesburg, Transvaal, South Africa
Cyanide dumps, Johannesburg, Transvaal, South Africa
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
General view of Johannesburg, Transvaal, South Africa
General view of Johannesburg, Transvaal, South Africa
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Toxic or poisonous substances. Pharmacy Museum. Turku. Finla
Toxic or poisonous substances. Pharmacy Museum. Turku. Finla
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Woman in the anonymous letter costume
Woman in the anonymous letter costume
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Marsh rosemary and deadly nightshade
Marsh rosemary and deadly nightshade
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Chinese gas mask
Chinese gas mask
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
GLC-LFB Fifty pump fire, Tooley Street, Southwark
GLC-LFB Fifty pump fire, Tooley Street, Southwark
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Taxus sp., yew
Taxus sp., yew
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Arsenic
Arsenic
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Victorian Wallpaper - in popular emerald green - which contained poisonous arsenic Featured Print

Victorian Wallpaper - in popular emerald green - which contained poisonous arsenic

Victorian Wallpaper - in popular emerald green - which contained poisonous arsenic. William Morris, famed for his wallpaper designs, was the son of the owner of the largest arsenic producing company in the country. He was sceptical that arsenic was bad for you and held that because he had arsenical wallpaper in his home (and wasn't sick) it had to be something else! Morris did however stop using arsenic in their papers as the result of public pressure, newspaper reports and a general idea that arsenic was toxic, not just when ingested. Date: 19th century

© Mary Evans / The National Archives, London. England.

Lead
Lead
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Mercury
Mercury
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Antarctic Discovery Collections
Antarctic Discovery Collections
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
GLC-LFB Chemical Incident Unit (CIU)
GLC-LFB Chemical Incident Unit (CIU)
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock
Death of Herakles
Death of Herakles
Full Range of Prints and Gifts in Stock