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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Sliding Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 75 pictures in our Sliding collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

WW1 - Battle of Dogger Bank - Sinking of SMS 'Blucher'

WW1 - Battle of Dogger Bank - A photograph showing the sinking of the German battle cruiser, SMS 'Blucher', after being shelled by the British in 1915. The crew can be seen clinging to the hull, others sliding into the water, and pouring from the bilge-keel. Above appears the wrecked tripod foremast and turret with guns tilted skyward. On the far right, smoke and flames are bursting from the ship's torn side by Brtitsh shells. Blucher was the only warship to have sunk during the battle. Date: 1915

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans

Featured Print

Invention of the Cube Car

Invention of the Cube Car. This box-like car, designed by French-Vietnamese designer and engineer Quasar Kahn (seen here driving), was produced in limited numbers between 1967 and 1968 by Universal Power Drives of Perivale, Middlesex, who also made the Unipower sports car. The car had a unique cube-like appearance, with sliding glass doors. It is probably unique amongst car designs in being wider than it is long. The seats were plastic and inflatable. The engine was a four cylinder 1100 cc BMC model with automatic transmission. Modified Mini subframes carried the suspension components and 10-inch Mini wheels were used. Date: 1967

© Mary Evans Picture Library/DAVID LEWIS HODGSON

Featured Print

LCC-LFB Fireman using the sliding pole

Following a visit to the United States, the Chief Officer (Captain Eyre Massey Shaw) saw these devices in American firehouses, and brought the idea into his own fire stations. Initially the poles just went through a hole in the upper floor. However after a couple of accidents the pole holes were protected to stop such accidents.

© London Fire Brigade / Mary Evans Picture Library