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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Signal Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 333 pictures in our Signal collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


The Last Stand Of The Northamptons At Saran Sar, Nov 9. 18 Featured Print

The Last Stand Of The Northamptons At Saran Sar, Nov 9. 18

Our gallant troops were in difficulties on the ridge after fierce and desperate fighting, and a signal was given to some of the Northamptons to seek assistance from the nearest quarter. Grandly they executed their mission; but on the return Lieut. Macintire and 12 men were cut away by the enemy. Wounded men lay around them and they would not desert them. Hoping in vain for help, they fought under the shadow of the rugged rocks until not a man was left. Their stripped bodies were found next day: Macintire well to the front. They did their best for England, home and duty, and they did not die in vain. The wounded were all brought in. True specimens, these gallant boys, of British pluck and heroism !

© Mary Evans Picture Library 2015 - https://copyrighthub.org/s0/hub1/creation/maryevans/MaryEvansPictureID/10223700

Nelsons last signal at Trafalgar, 21 October 1805 Featured Print

Nelsons last signal at Trafalgar, 21 October 1805

At the Battle of Trafalgar on 21 October 1805, Nelson gives his famous last signal England expects that every man will do his duty'. He had said to his officers I must give the Fleet something by way of a fillip'. This last signal certainly buoyed the Fleet as there was an answering of enthusiastic cheering and England went on to win the battle though Nelson lost his life that day. This reproduction is from the original painting by Thomas Davidson

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans

Lecture on Stephen Grays discoveries in electricity Featured Print

Lecture on Stephen Grays discoveries in electricity

A lecture at the Charterhouse, London on Stephen Gray's discoveries in electricity. In the early eighteenth century, Gray demonstrated that charges of electricity could be conducted by some materials for distances as great as 765 feet, while others did not conduct electricity at all. Eventually, he was able to send charges through 88 metres of wire suspended on silken threads to operate an electroscope - an instrument used to detect static electricity. By sending an electrical signal from one place to another, Gray established the basic principle of the electric telegraph

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans