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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
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Sefton Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 28 pictures in our Sefton collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

WW1 - Titled Women Munitions Workers

The first contingent of Titled Society ladies who volunteered to work for Messrs. Vickers, Sons and Maxim as shell makers. In this group are Lady Gertrude Crawford, sister of the Earl of Sefton; Lady Gatacre, Lady Colebrooke, Mrs Pearson, Mrs Greig and other well-known ladies. The caption details that 'delicacy of manipulation is a feminine instinct' and therefore the work is certainly not 'unsuitable'! In August 1915, Eve in The Tatler was also listing some of the new workers at the Vickers factory: "Erith is the latest craze. Here, at Messrs. Vickers, a gallant band of women are really doing it. Not just playing about, you know, but living at a hostel and taking the regular rate of pay I think its not quite enough to pay for two stalls at the newest revue each week. Lady Gertrude Crawford and Lady Colebrooke are among the toilers, and Lady Gatacre too Lady Scott, Captain Scotts widow, is also working at this particular factory, but hers is skilled electrical work. (*Kathleen Bruce, Lady Scott, spent much of 1917 manufacturing electrical coils at the factory. She also devoted time establishing an ambulance service in France, working at the Ministry of Pensions and, in 1918, put her talent as a sculptor to use helping to reconstruct the faces of wounded soldiers). Vickers are willing to take a lot more women to train during the week-ends so as to have them ready for work at the new munition factories, for there wont be enough men to go round, Im told." Date: 1915

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans

Featured Print

Major-General W. S. Brancker

Major-General Sir William Sefton Brancker (1877-1930), civil aviation pioneer, portrayed by Lieutenant Percival Anderson during the First World War when he was Comptroller-General of Equipment on the Air Council. Brancker was trained for the British Army at Woolwich, joining the Royal Artillery in 1896. He served in the Second Boer War and later for a number of years in India, where he made his first flight in 1910. On 18 June 1913 he was awarded the Royal Aero Club's Aviator's Certificate no. 525. During World War I, he held important administrative posts in the Royal Flying Corps and later the Royal Air Force including Director of Air Organisation and Director of Military Aeronautics. In 1917, Brancker briefly served as the General Officer Commanding Royal Flying Corps's Palestine Headquarters and then its Middle East headquarters. Promoted to major-general in 1918, he became Controller-General of Equipment in January of that year and Master-General of Personnel in August 1918. The following year, he was appointed KCB and with the introduction of RAF-specific ranks, he became an air vice-marshal. n 1922 he was made Director of Civil Aviation, and worked assiduously to stimulate UK interest in the subject with both local authorities and flying clubs. He encouraged Manchester and other cities to construct municipal airports and airfields. He participated in several long-distance survey flights, notably with Alan Cobham. He was an ardent supporter of the development of British civilian air services connecting London to British colonies and dominions overseas. In 1930, he was killed when the R101 airship crashed near Beauvais France on 5 October 1930, during its maiden voyage to India. Sir Sefton was chairman of the Royal Aero Club's (RAeC) Racing Committee from 1921 to 1930 and his dynamic leadership led to the RAeC forming the Light Aero Club scheme in 1925, which helped provide the UK clubs with examples of such new and improved aircraft types as the de

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans