sales@mediastorehouse.co.uk
Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Raleigh Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 83 pictures in our Raleigh collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

Cheer, Boys! Cheer by Augustus Harris, Raleigh and Hamilton

Cheer, Boys! Cheer by Sir Augustus Harris (18 March 1852 22 June 1896), Cecil Raleigh (27 January 1856 10 November 1914) and Henry Hamilton (c. 1853 4 September 1918). First produced at the Drury Lane Theatre in London on 19th September 1895. The outbreak of war prompted the revival of this old melodrama at the Princes Theatre on 17th October 1914, as it dealt with military exploits in Matabeleland, Zimbabwe, but it ran for only 33 performances. Reverse bears a stirring verse by Henry Russell? The artists' signature looks like S. Brimult? Date: 1914

© The Michael Diamond Collection / Mary Evans Picture Library

Featured Print

Merrie England by Basil Hood

Promotional postcard for Merrie England by Basil Hood; music Edward German. First produced at the Savoy Theatre, 2nd April 1902. The patriotic story concerns love and rivalries at the court of Queen Elizabeth I, when a love letter sent by Sir Walter Raleigh to one of Queen Elizabeths Ladies in Waiting, Bessie Throckmorton, ends up in the hands of the Queen. Flier for the Hastings and St. Leonards Operatic and Dramatic Society, at the Gaiety Theatre, Hastings 18th April 1912, but the image would almost certainly have already been used for a poster for a professional company. Date: circa 1912

© The Michael Diamond Collection / Mary Evans Picture Library

Featured Print

Walter Raleigh lays his cloak at Queen Elizabeth I's feet

Sir Walter Raleigh lays his cloak at Queen Elizabeth I's feet to prevent her from getting muddy feet. The fanciful, romantic tale of the cloak and the mud puddle probably originated with historian Thomas Fuller, known for his imaginative elaborations on historical fact. Later, Sir Walter Scott kept the myth alive in his 1821 Elizabethan romance, Kenilworth. "Hark ye, Master Raleigh, see thou fail not to wear thy muddy cloak," the queen exhorts Sir Walter, "in token of penitence, till our pleasure be further known." Sir Walter vows never to clean the cloak, and later the queen, delighted with his gallantry, invites him to visit the royal wardrobe keeper that he may be fitted for "a suit, and that of the newest cut." Date: 1581

© The Russell Butcher Collection / Mary Evans Picture Library