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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Piercing Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 48 pictures in our Piercing collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

Member of the Meru Tribe - Kenya, East Africa

Memeber of the Meru Tribe - Kenya, East Africa. Both men and women of this region stretch their ears, although today more women than men follow the practice. Originally, the piercing was done with a sharpened object such as the point of a knife or a thorn. Heavy jewelry was then placed in the hole to increase the size with materials such as animal bones, wood, stone, and tusks used for jewelry (as shown here) . Date: circa 1910s

© Mary Evans / Grenville Collins Postcard Collection

Featured Print

Thaipusam, Hindu Festival - Singapore - Vel Kavadi

Thaipusam, Hindu Festival, marked by Piercings and Painful Rituals in Singapore. The festival is mainly observed in countries where there is a significant presence of Tamil community such as India, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Mauritius, Singapore, Indonesia, Thailand and Myanmar. Devotees practice mortification of the flesh (Vel Kavadi) by piercing the skin, tongue or cheeks with vel skewers (as shown here). Date: circa 1920s

© Mary Evans / Grenville Collins Postcard Collection

Featured Print

India - A Brahmin lady

India - A Brahmin lady with distinctive nose piercings. Brahmin is the class of educators, law makers, scholars and preachers of Dharma in Hinduism, occupying the highest position among the four varnas of India. The outside of the left nostril is the preferred position of nasal piercing in India, as this is supposed to make childbirth easier (as Ayurvedic medicine associates this location with the female reproductive organs). In India piercings were regarded as a mark of beauty and social standing in addition to a Hindu's honour to Parvathi (the Goddess of marriage) from the 16th century. Date: 1908

© Mary Evans / Grenville Collins Postcard Collection