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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Munition Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 95 pictures in our Munition collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

History. World War II. Latvia. Bullets found in the field of

History. World War II. Latvia. Bullets found in the field of Battle near and More. Over 200 Latvians died between September 26 to 29, 1944. The Division Latvian Legion 19 or 19th Waffen SS Grenadier Division stopped the Red Army's advance towards Riga. The objects were excavated between 1994 and 1997. Occupation Museum. Riga. Latvia.

© Thaliastock / Mary Evans

Featured Print

WW1 - Titled Women Munitions Workers

The first contingent of Titled Society ladies who volunteered to work for Messrs. Vickers, Sons and Maxim as shell makers. In this group are Lady Gertrude Crawford, sister of the Earl of Sefton; Lady Gatacre, Lady Colebrooke, Mrs Pearson, Mrs Greig and other well-known ladies. The caption details that 'delicacy of manipulation is a feminine instinct' and therefore the work is certainly not 'unsuitable'! In August 1915, Eve in The Tatler was also listing some of the new workers at the Vickers factory: "Erith is the latest craze. Here, at Messrs. Vickers, a gallant band of women are really doing it. Not just playing about, you know, but living at a hostel and taking the regular rate of pay I think its not quite enough to pay for two stalls at the newest revue each week. Lady Gertrude Crawford and Lady Colebrooke are among the toilers, and Lady Gatacre too Lady Scott, Captain Scotts widow, is also working at this particular factory, but hers is skilled electrical work. (*Kathleen Bruce, Lady Scott, spent much of 1917 manufacturing electrical coils at the factory. She also devoted time establishing an ambulance service in France, working at the Ministry of Pensions and, in 1918, put her talent as a sculptor to use helping to reconstruct the faces of wounded soldiers). Vickers are willing to take a lot more women to train during the week-ends so as to have them ready for work at the new munition factories, for there wont be enough men to go round, Im told." Date: 1915

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans

Featured Print

Harlene hair tonic advertisement, WW1

First World War advertisement for Harlene hair products, discussing in great detail the 'alarming epidemic of hair troubles' resulting from war conditions. Anyone worried about the state of their hair, such as these female munition workers, could write for a four page advice leaflet to Edwards' Harlene Ltd at Lamb's Conduit Street, London. Date: 1916

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans