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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Message Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 258 pictures in our Message collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


SOS message from Titanic Featured Print

SOS message from Titanic

A wireless message received by the Russian steamer Birma from the Titanic about five minutes after Titanic struck the iceberg that sank her. The Titanic is identified by her code letters MGY and the message uses both old distress call letters CQD (Come Quickly Danger) and new, SOS. It reads, "CQD - SOS from M.G.Y. We have struck iceberg sinking fast come to our assistance. Position Lat 41, 46 N., Long 50, 14 W. - MGY." Date: 14th April 1912

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans

Portrait of Ethel Le Neve Featured Print

Portrait of Ethel Le Neve

Ethel Le Neve, Dr Crippen's mistress. Dr Crippen, an American citizen, lived at 39 Hilldrop Cresent, Camden, London. He was accused of murdering his wife when she disappeared under suspicious circumstances. Crippen had told friends that his wife, Belle Elmore had died due to illness, but when first questioned by police he told them she had eloped with a lover. The police returned to Hilldrop Cresent to question Crippen a second time only to discover that he and his mistress, Miss Le Neve had disappeared. Detectives searched around the house and uncovered a headless body in the cellar. A warrant was released for Dr Crippen's arrest. The captain of the ship, the 'Montrose', on which Crippen was travelling in disguise, suspected him and his fellow passenger, Le Neve (dressed as a boy). The captain sent a wireless message to Scotland Yard, telling of his suspicions. The ship was greeted by the police and Dr Crippen and Miss Le Neve were arrested. Crippen was tried for murder and sentenced to death, whilst Miss Le Neve was acquitted and moved to America under a different name.

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans

Signallers with the King?s African Rifles Featured Print

Signallers with the King?s African Rifles

Photograph: Signallers with the King?s African Rifles taking down a message, 1943. Captioned: Signaller taking down a messge. Signals units made an invaluable contribution to the success of the King?s African Rifles in Burma. Signallers faced a plethora of difficulties in the harsh climate. These included steep hills, torrential monsoon rainfall, heat and humidity, which all served to block or weaken radio signals. This combined with the weight and limited reliability of the radio sets, the problems with batteries and charging engines, the constant laying and repairing of telephone cable, illustrates the magnitude of their achievement in maintaining effective communications during the campaign. From collection of photographs of King?s African Rifles during World War Two (1939-1945). 41 loose leaves containing 93 photographs. Date: 1943

© The National Army Museum / Mary Evans Picture Library