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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Jolly Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 342 pictures in our Jolly collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

The Scout magazine, Special Hobbies and Model-Making Number

Front cover of The Scout magazine, "The Only Weekly Official Organ of the Boy Scouts". As this particular issue is the Special Hobbies and Model-Making number, the front cover depicts two jolly boys, one in a Scout uniform flying toy planes which they have evidently knocked up out of wood with some whittling tools and glue. Other busy boys are seen indulging in wholesome activities - with a home made wireless sets, printing things and, of course, perusing a stamp album.

© Mary Evans Picture Library

Featured Print

Karl Marx, German political writer and revolutionary

Karl Marx (1818-1883), German philosopher, political economist, historian, political theorist, sociologist, communist and revolutionary. Seen here in later years with white hair and beard.

© Mary Evans / Marx Memorial Library

1818, 1880s, 1882, 1883, 839, Beard, Communism, Communist, Economist, German, Hair, Historian, Historical, History, Jolly, Marx, Marxism, Marxist, Philosopher, Philosophy, Political, Politics, Revolutionary, Science, Scientist, Smiling, Social, Sociologist, Sociology, Theorist, Theory, Victorian, White

Featured Print

Skull and Crossbones - Inverted

The Jolly Roger is the name given to any of various flags flown to identify a ship's crew as pirates. The flag most usually identified as the Jolly Roger today is the skull and crossbones, being a flag consisting of a skull above two long bones set in an x-mark arrangement. This design was used by four pirates, captains Edward England, John Taylor, Sam Bellamy and John Martel.Despite its appearance in popular culture, plain black flags were often employed by most pirates in the 17th-18th century. Historically, the flag was flown to frighten pirates' victims into surrendering without a fight, since it conveyed the message that the attackers were outlaws who would not consider themselves bound by the usual rules of engagement and might, therefore, slaughter those they defeated.

© Mary Evans Picture Library/TOM GILLMOR