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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Fictional Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 65 pictures in our Fictional collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


The Kaiser handing over his sword to Douglas Haig Featured Print

The Kaiser handing over his sword to Douglas Haig

"The Next Haig Convention" By the 23rd of October, Britain could almost taste victory and this picture by Arthur Ferrier, showing a cowed Kaiser handing over his sword to Douglas Haig, would be frighteningly accurate if it were not for the fact that the Allies demanded the Kaiser's abdication before they would discuss armistice terms. "Little Willie", the Kaier's eldest son, and the bulk of the Hindenburg complete a fairly dejected trio. Arthur Ferrier led a colourful life. Born in Scotland, he began his career as an analytical chemist, before becoming a cartoonist at the Daily Record in Glasgow. His move to London saw him contribute to Punch, London Opinion and tit-Bits as well as The Bystander and The Sketch in later years. He is best known for pioneering the glamorous cartoon strip girl, and illustrating 1940s and 50s theatreland. A great socialite and raconteur, his Times obituary referred to him as a "cartoonist, portrait painter, bon viveur and wit". Date: 1918

© Illustrated London News/Mary Evans

Eve of The Tatler in the revue, Tina at the Adelphi, WW1 Featured Print

Eve of The Tatler in the revue, Tina at the Adelphi, WW1

Actresses, including Phyllis Dare, playing Eve, the fictional lead columnist, drawn by Annie Fish for The Tatler magazine, whose stylish and stylised costumes were recreated (quite brilliantly I should say) for real in a sketch devoted to the character, as part of a revue, "Tina" at the Adelphi Theatre in 1916. Both The Sketch and The Tatler magazines reported (sometimes with sketches) that the costumes had inspired real-life spring fashions. Paul Rubens composed the music for Eve's number. Tatler wrote, we are proud that our little creation should have been materialised in such a brilliant fashion. None of our readers should miss seeing this delightful number. Date: 1916

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans

Advertisement for The Eve Book, 1916 Featured Print

Advertisement for The Eve Book, 1916

Advertisement for The Eve Book, drawn by (Annie) Fish and designed by Fowl and published by Messrs. Constable & Co. Eve was the fictional gossip columnist of The Tatler and the stylised illustrations by Annie Fish gave a humorous take on society life. During the First World War, drawings of Eve were exhibited at the Fine Art Society in Bond Street and this book was issued at the same time. Date: 1916

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans