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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Etiquette Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 127 pictures in our Etiquette collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

Common courtesy training / W H Robinson

Training a husband in the act of common courtesy, using a dressmaker's dummy, a piece of string and a determined wife. A quick jerk of the string and the husbands hat swiftly rearranges itself, so that he may imagine saluting, possibly, the vicars wife. Please note: Credit must appear as (c) Courtesy of the estate of Mrs J.C.Robinson/Pollinger Ltd/Mary Evans Picture Library

© Courtesy of the estate of Mrs J.C.Robinson/Pollinger Ltd/Mary Evans Picture Library

Featured Print

WW1 - English Officers having tea on their way to the front

WW1 - English Officers having their afternoon tea (at 4:30pm on the dot) on their way to the front. They appear to have invited a French guest (far left). Note the fine china tea service, Denby ironstone teapot, white linen tablecloth and delicate silver teaspoons. Date: 1914

© Mary Evans / Grenville Collins Postcard Collection

1st, Afternoon, British, Britishness, China, English, Etiquette, Fine, France, French, Front, Great, Guest, Invited, Military, Officers, Porcelain, Protocol, Tea, War, World, Ww1, Wwi

Featured Print

Walter Raleigh lays his cloak at Queen Elizabeth I's feet

Sir Walter Raleigh lays his cloak at Queen Elizabeth I's feet to prevent her from getting muddy feet. The fanciful, romantic tale of the cloak and the mud puddle probably originated with historian Thomas Fuller, known for his imaginative elaborations on historical fact. Later, Sir Walter Scott kept the myth alive in his 1821 Elizabethan romance, Kenilworth. "Hark ye, Master Raleigh, see thou fail not to wear thy muddy cloak," the queen exhorts Sir Walter, "in token of penitence, till our pleasure be further known." Sir Walter vows never to clean the cloak, and later the queen, delighted with his gallantry, invites him to visit the royal wardrobe keeper that he may be fitted for "a suit, and that of the newest cut." Date: 1581

© The Russell Butcher Collection / Mary Evans Picture Library