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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Enfield Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 70 pictures in our Enfield collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Indian Smoothbore .656 in musket, Pattern 1858 Featured Print

Indian Smoothbore .656 in musket, Pattern 1858

Indian Smoothbore .656 in musket, Pattern 1858, lock dated 1856.Converted from a Pattern 1853 Enfield rifle-musket in India 1858 (c), this exceptionally rare item was part of an original issue of 10, 000 weapons sold by the British Government to the East Indian Company in 1856. These weapons were a contributory cause of the Indian Mutiny because of the belief that animal fat had been incorporated in the grease for the cartridges. After the Mutiny, most Indian troops were issued with smooth-bore muskets which at the same time were to look similar to Enfield rifles. In this case the original rifling was bored out and a locally-made ramrod fitted. Also, a simple fixed backsight replaced the graduated rear sight of the Enfield.Now in poor condition, it is identified by the faint stamp on the butt of the EIC lion rampant regardment and holding the crown. In addition the initials WD (War Department) over the broad arrow combined with I (India) and the date 1856 are present. The weapon was subsequently bored smooth and re-sighted to conform with the pattern 1858-1859 .656in muskets for Native Infantry. Date: 1858

© The National Army Museum / Mary Evans Picture Library

Indian soldiers using a Bren gun Featured Print

Indian soldiers using a Bren gun

Photograph of Indian soldiers using a Bren gun. A gas-operated weapon, the Bren used the same . 303 ammunition as the standard British rifle, the Lee-Enfield, firing at a rate of between 480 and 540 rounds per minute (rpm), depending on the model. It was the standard light machine gun of Commonwealth armies during World War Two. The Indian Army used it widely, although the Vickers-Berthier was later adopted as well. Part of a collection of official photographs from Middle and Far East, World War Two. Collected by Maj Gen (later Lt Gen) Sir Frank Walter Messervy. Date: 1945

© The National Army Museum / Mary Evans Picture Library

Students with underwater house equipment, Malta Featured Print

Students with underwater house equipment, Malta

Students and equipment connected with an underwater, inflatable house on a beach in Malta. One student is being fitted with diving gear. The house was anchored to the seabed, some 50 feet deep, in Paradise Bay, off the coast of Malta. It was equipped with lighting, telephone and immersion heaters with which the inhabitants could make hot drinks. It was constructed by teams of engineers and diving enthusiasts from Imperial College of Science and Technology and Enfield College of Technology. It was 9ft long and 6ft wide, constructed from rubberised material on a steel frame, and weighed around 500 lb. The team leader was David Baume who hoped it would be the first of a series of low cost underwater living spaces from which scientists could explore the seas. David and some other team members were able to spend a night 30 feet below the surface. The following day a severe storm caused the house to collapse. Date: 1969

© Mary Evans Picture Library/DAVID LEWIS HODGSON