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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Our Disappeared Collection of Images

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 65 pictures in our Our Disappeared Collection of Images collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

Portrait of Ethel Le Neve

Ethel Le Neve, Dr Crippen's mistress. Dr Crippen, an American citizen, lived at 39 Hilldrop Cresent, Camden, London. He was accused of murdering his wife when she disappeared under suspicious circumstances. Crippen had told friends that his wife, Belle Elmore had died due to illness, but when first questioned by police he told them she had eloped with a lover. The police returned to Hilldrop Cresent to question Crippen a second time only to discover that he and his mistress, Miss Le Neve had disappeared. Detectives searched around the house and uncovered a headless body in the cellar. A warrant was released for Dr Crippen's arrest. The captain of the ship, the 'Montrose', on which Crippen was travelling in disguise, suspected him and his fellow passenger, Le Neve (dressed as a boy). The captain sent a wireless message to Scotland Yard, telling of his suspicions. The ship was greeted by the police and Dr Crippen and Miss Le Neve were arrested. Crippen was tried for murder and sentenced to death, whilst Miss Le Neve was acquitted and moved to America under a different name.

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans

Featured Print

Entrance to the dockyard, Portsmouth

Entrance to the dockyard at Portsmouth, where Lieutenant Commander Lionel Kenneth Phillip 'Buster' Crabb (1909-1956) disappeared on 19 April 1956. Crabb was a British Royal Naval frogman and MI6 diver (some would say sabotage agent and alleged double agent), who disappeared during a reconnaissance mission investigating the Soviet cruiser Ordzhonikidze in Portsmouth Harbour. A body was found months later, but it was difficult to identify as the head and hands were missing. Date: 1972

© Mary Evans Picture Library/DAVID LEWIS HODGSON

Featured Print

Ice Implements for use in the Arctic, 1848

Engraving showing a number of ice implements used by Sir James Clark Ross's Search Expedition to the Arctic in 1848-1849. The implements are (clockwise from top) an ice saw, ice chisel, ice pole, ice hook, ice claw, ice anchor and an ice hatchet. Ross's expedition was one of many to search the Arctic for signs of Sir John Franklin's ill-fated Arctic expedition of 1845. In 1845 the British Admiralty sent two polar exploration ships, HMS 'Erebus' and HMS 'Terror', to look for the Northwest passage round the northern coast of Canada. The expedition, commanded by Sir John Franklin, disappeared from view late in 1845 and none of the men were ever seen again. In fact the ships made it to the King William Island region, then got stuck in the ice. With supplies running out the surviving crew abandoned ship and headed south. However, none made it to safety and it is assumed all died from disease, exposure or starvation. From 1848 onwards a number of relief expeditions were sent to find Franklin, but it was only in 1859 that Francis Leopold McClintock was able to confirm Franklin's fate.

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans