sales@mediastorehouse.co.uk
Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Dated Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 165 pictures in our Dated collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

Indian Smoothbore .656 in musket, Pattern 1858

Indian Smoothbore .656 in musket, Pattern 1858, lock dated 1856.Converted from a Pattern 1853 Enfield rifle-musket in India 1858 (c), this exceptionally rare item was part of an original issue of 10, 000 weapons sold by the British Government to the East Indian Company in 1856. These weapons were a contributory cause of the Indian Mutiny because of the belief that animal fat had been incorporated in the grease for the cartridges. After the Mutiny, most Indian troops were issued with smooth-bore muskets which at the same time were to look similar to Enfield rifles. In this case the original rifling was bored out and a locally-made ramrod fitted. Also, a simple fixed backsight replaced the graduated rear sight of the Enfield.Now in poor condition, it is identified by the faint stamp on the butt of the EIC lion rampant regardment and holding the crown. In addition the initials 'WD' (War Department) over the broad arrow combined with 'I' (India) and the date 1856 are present. The weapon was subsequently bored smooth and re-sighted to conform with the pattern 1858-1859 .656in muskets for Native Infantry. Date: 1858

© The National Army Museum / Mary Evans Picture Library

Featured Print

The Artists' Rifles in Camp, 1884

The Artists' Rifles in Camp, 1884.Oil on canvas, signed and dated lower left 'Godfrey Merry 1884', by Godfrey Pitney Merry, (fl 1883-1915), 1884.In August 1884 the 20th Middlesex (Artists') Rifle Volunteers held their camp at Aldershot. Attendance at these summer camps was voluntary and usually not very well attended, while the long Easter weekend camp was much more popular. Here the volunteers are shown preparing for drill. Some are almost ready, equipped with blanket rolls and Snider rifles, while the soldier buying fish still needs to change his fashionable, but non-regulation, two-tone shoes.Following the formation in 1859 of the Volunteer Force for national defence, the regiment was raised in 1860 as the 38th Middlesex (Artists) Rifle Volunteers. It was so-named as it was mainly composed of painters, sculptors, engravers, musicians, architects and actors. One of the first officers was Frederick (later Lord) Leighton, who was subsequently both Honorary Colonel of the regiment and President of the Royal Academy of Arts. Other famous volunteers include John Everett Millais, William Morris and Holman Hunt.In 1880 the regiment was renumbered the 20th Middlesex (Artists') Rifle Volunteers. The following year it became a volunteer battalion of the Rifle Brigade. In 1908 it changed to the 28th (County of London) Battalion, the London Regiment (Artists? Rifles). Following a number of redesignations, in 1950 the unit became 21st Regiment Special Air Service (TA), the territorial unit of the SAS. Date: 1884

© The National Army Museum / Mary Evans Picture Library

Featured Print

Major-General John Alexander Dunlop Agnew Wallace

Major General John Alexander Dunlop Agnew Wallace (later General Sir J Wallace Bt KCB, Colonel of the 88th Regiment of Foot (Connaught Rangers) (1775?-1857), 1835 (c).Oil on canvas after William Smellie Watson RSA (1796-1874), signed and dated at lower left Herbert Sidney 1892/ after Smellie Watson, by Herbert Sidney (1858-1923), 1892.Three-quarter-length, in major generals full dress with decorations, his left hand holding his hat and gloves.Wallace went to the Peninsula in 1809 in command of the newly-raised 2nd Battalion of the 88th Regiment of Foot (Connaught Rangers which greatly distinguished itself at Busaco. The Duke of Wellington is reported to have said, Wallace, I never saw a more gallant charge than that just made by your regiment, and mentioned this in his despatch. Wallace commanded the regiment at Fuentes dOnoro in 1811 and was mentioned in despatches again, as he was after the Battle of Salamanca in 1812, when he commanded the right brigade of the third division. On 12 August 1819 he was made a major general and he received the KCB in 1833. He retired at the rank of general and died at Stranraer aged 82, in 1857.Wallace wears the Star and neck badge of the KCB, the Army Gold Medal with clasps and the Waterloo Medal. Oil on canvas Date: circa 1829

© The National Army Museum / Mary Evans Picture Library