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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Associated Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 134 pictures in our Associated collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

Grafiti Wall, Belfast, 1973

?Graf?ti Wall?, Belfast, 1973 - Oil on board, by Ralph Lillford, 1973. Associated with Northern Ireland (1969-2007). During ?the Troubles?, Belfast street walls became a place for rival sectarian graf?ti, often painted layer upon layer. A form of psychological warfare which also demonstrated control of terrain, the slogans were often directed at the British Army, exhorting them to ?go home?, or else boasted of paramilitary loyalties, such as ?Provos Rule?. Periodically the Army would drive past these walls and throw paint bombs at the slogans. The soldier wears a fragmentation vest, commonly known as a flak jacket, over DPM (disruptive pattern material) jacket and trousers. He wears his visor up on his helmet and carries an anti-riot shield. Date: 1974

© The National Army Museum / Mary Evans Picture Library

Featured Print

Clerkenwell Cavalry

Clerkenwell Cavalry. Aquatint by and after Thomas Rowlandson, 1799 (c). From a volume of 86 aquatints entitled ?Loyal Volunteers of London and Environs?, published by R Ackermann, 101 Strand, London, 12 Aug 1799. Associated with Wars of the French Revolution, Home Defence (1793-1802). Date: circa 1799

© The National Army Museum / Mary Evans Picture Library

Featured Print

Soldiers of the 72nd (Duke of Albany?s Own Highlanders) Reg

Photograph: Soldiers of the 72nd (Duke of Albany?s Own Highlanders) Regiment, 1879. From an album of 60 photographs by John Burke, 1878-1880. Associated with Maj Gen Frederick Sleigh Roberts, 2nd Afghan War (1878-1880). Soldiers of the 72nd (Duke of Albany?s Own Highlanders) Regiment in Afghanistan exhibit the range of signalling devices available before the advent of either the field telephone or radio. Flags enabled the relaying of messages by semaphore. The Mance heliograph, a small mirror mounted on a tripod, worked by reflecting sunlight in order to flash messages in Morse code: on 22 April 1880, news of the Battle of Ahmed Khel was relayed by heliograph to another British column 50 miles away. At night, when there was no sunlight, the shuttered Aldis lamp was used to flash signals instead. Finally, the signallers? telescope enabled them to see long distance messages more easily. Date: 1879

© The National Army Museum / Mary Evans Picture Library