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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Arrived Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 104 pictures in our Arrived collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

Flying for the Summer Week-end by C.E. Turner

Illustration from 1928 by C.E. Turner reflecting the growing rise of civilian flying in the 1920s. The caption reads,'...only last month there was a house-party at which the ten guests (all owners of 'planes) arrived from London and Canterbury in five 'Moths' and a 'Widgeon.' The landings were made in the host's grounds, and the little flying-machines were housed in the ordinary car garages. On the Sunday, the host adn hostess, accompanying their guests, the whole party flew from Cirencester to Lambourne Down, in Berkshire, for a picnic. Our drawing does not illustrate a particular event, at which Mr and Mrs. Fitzgerald, or Marsden Manor, Cirencester, were the hosts but it is typical.'

© Mary Evans Picture Library 2015 - https://copyrighthub.org/s0/hub1/creation/maryevans/MaryEvansPictureID/10224234

Featured Print

Indian Cavalry await the order to advance, Western Front

Photograph: Indian Cavalry await the order to advance, Western Front, 1916 (c).In August 1914 an Indian Corps, including cavalry units, arrived in France. While the infantry were withdrawn to Mesopotamia in December 1915, most of the cavalry remained on the Western Front until 1918. It was hoped that once the enemy's front-line had been broken the cavalry would exploit the breach using their superior speed to reach the enemy's rear positions and destroy supply and communications lines. The static nature of much of the fighting on the Western Front meant that this did not occur and many cavalry soldiers ended up serving as infantrymen.Collection of 98 official war photographs illustrating the British advance in the Western Front Campaign, World War One (1914-1918).From the collection of the former Buffs Regimental Museum. Date: 1916

© The National Army Museum / Mary Evans Picture Library

Featured Print

Telegram mobilising VAD 1914

This telegram, sent to Birchington late in the day on 14 October 1914, was the call to mobilise the local Voluntary Aid Detachments to set up their hospitals. In just a few hours detachments had to call in the promises of loans for furniture, bedding and equipment and set up their hospitals. There was considerable confusion. The train carrying the patients, eventually arrived several hours late, having travelled around much of Kent. Instead of 100 patients, 145 were disembarked from the train. All were Belgian soldiers. Eventually all were found a bed, although some were temproary - mattresses laid on the floor in the dining room of Quex House for example. This experience was repeated all over Kent and beyond as several thousand Belgian soldiers were evacuated from Ostend by the British Government. For Quex Park it was the start of four and a half years as a VAD Hospital. The Quex Park VAD Hospital opened on 15 October 1914 and closed on 31 January 1919. The hospital was run by Kent/178, the Birchington Detachment. The Commandant was Hannah Powell-Cotton (1881-1964), wife of Major Percy HG Powell-Cotton (1866-1940) of Quex Park, founder of the Powell-Cotton Museum. Major Powell-Cotton was the VAD Transport Officer for the Isle of Thanet area, responsible for organising the transport of patients from the stations to the local hospitals. Date: 1914

© The Powell-Cotton Museum Collection / Mary Evans Picture Library