sales@mediastorehouse.com
Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Afghan Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 172 pictures in our Afghan collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

Panjdeh incident - Russian encounter with Afghan forces at Pul-i-Khishty (Brick Bridge)

Panjdeh incident - Russian encounter with Afghan forces at Pul-i-Khishty (Brick Bridge) . The 'incident' of 1885 was a diplomatic crisis between the British Empire and the Russian Empire caused by Russian expansion south-eastwards towards the Emirate of Afghanistan and the British Raj (India). After nearly completing the Russian conquest of Central Asia (Russian Turkestan) Russian forces captured an Afghan border fort. Seeing a threat to India, Britain came close to threatening war but both sides backed down and the matter was settled by diplomacy. The effect was to stop further Russian expansion in Asia, except for the Pamir Mountains and to define the north-western border of Afghanistan. Date: 1885

© Mary Evans Picture Library

Featured Print

Shirtwaister dress by Michael, 1959

An elegant outfit comprising of a white silk shirtwaister dress belted with tan suede designed by Michael of Carlos Place, worn with a coat in a pale honey colour made of Seker's open basket weave wool edged with petersham. Mme. Brill made the white leather hat which was also designed by Michael. Where the docile Afghan Hound came from is not commented upon. Date: 1959

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans

Featured Print

Soldiers of the 72nd (Duke of Albany?s Own Highlanders) Reg

Photograph: Soldiers of the 72nd (Duke of Albany?s Own Highlanders) Regiment, 1879. From an album of 60 photographs by John Burke, 1878-1880. Associated with Maj Gen Frederick Sleigh Roberts, 2nd Afghan War (1878-1880). Soldiers of the 72nd (Duke of Albany?s Own Highlanders) Regiment in Afghanistan exhibit the range of signalling devices available before the advent of either the field telephone or radio. Flags enabled the relaying of messages by semaphore. The Mance heliograph, a small mirror mounted on a tripod, worked by reflecting sunlight in order to flash messages in Morse code: on 22 April 1880, news of the Battle of Ahmed Khel was relayed by heliograph to another British column 50 miles away. At night, when there was no sunlight, the shuttered Aldis lamp was used to flash signals instead. Finally, the signallers? telescope enabled them to see long distance messages more easily. Date: 1879

© The National Army Museum / Mary Evans Picture Library